Dentistry

Dental disease is the most common health problem in cats and dogs. Although it may cause distant disease in the body such as kidney or liver problems, the biggest problem is that it is a significant source of pain. Proper dental care is the quickest way to eliminate pain and make your pet feel like new. Just like dental care in humans, your pet needs a thorough, safe, and trustworthy veterinary dental team. At Wheatland, we take all of the steps to provide the best and safest dental care available.

Dental procedures in pets require anesthesia, both for safety and to reduce the fear that could be caused by performing these procedures in an awake patient. At Wheatland, all dental patients receive pre-anesthetic sedation and pain control, helping to reduce the amount of anesthetic necessary and make your pet more comfortable. Once under anesthesia, we give every patient IV fluids and measure all vital health parameters, including blood pressure. Most importantly, each pet has their own personal nurse monitoring and caring for them from their pre-medication, throughout their dental procedure, and during recovery after anesthesia.

The dental procedure itself contains several steps in order to provide the best dental evaluation and treatment possible. Our veterinarians evaluate each individual tooth for evidence of advanced dental disease (recession of the gum lines, root exposure, abscesses, broken teeth, or pockets below the gum line). Teeth that are suspicious for advanced disease are x-rayed for further evaluation, just like our human dentists would perform on us. If the exam and x-rays warrant extraction, we will use local anesthetics (like the numbing injections we get at the dentist) to control pain and then extract the tooth. Afterwards, the teeth are all thoroughly cleaned and polished to revitalize the health of the teeth and help with bad breath!

Our use of dental x-rays makes our dental procedures the best around. You wouldn't let your dentist remove your tooth without taking X-rays first, would you? You shouldn't let your veterinarian either!

After the dental procedure is completed, pets are placed in a warm bed with blankets, warm air circulators, and hot water bottles to keep them relaxed and comfortable while they recover from anesthesia, all while being closely monitored by their nurse. They all get to go home the same day and will be discharged with a full report containing all exam findings, procedures performed, x-ray images, and even before and after pictures!

Dental